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DanH
Come on, there’s not some fundamental inability to win from the good players there. That “losing mentality” team gave the championship Raps literally all they could handle down to a single shot, with Embiid leading the way. 

They screwed up the rebuild accelerating too fast once they had gotten their stars (the whole point of the process was to not stop tanking until you had talent - a well executed version would be done within 2-3 years), their stars were still good enough to drag them to some success when they made the Jimmy acquisition to help them out, and then they screwed up even more letting him walk to instead overpay role players. What’s the difference between the team that almost stopped the Raps’ championship path dead in its tracks and this one? It ain’t Embiid suddenly becoming a loser because of the teams he wasn’t even playing for losing games years before.
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DanH
DocHolliday wrote:


TBH, Horford has only 3 years and I'll take his competitiveness over Embiid's.   What if the Sixers traded Embiid to NY for RJ, Randle, #8 pick?  Gives the team some cap relief and a quality player and a top 10 pick.


This would be a great result for the rest of the East. New York will screw it up no matter who they have, and Philly would be way worse. Sounds good to me.
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Northern Neighbour
DanH wrote:
Come on, there’s not some fundamental inability to win from the good players there. That “losing mentality” team gave the championship Raps literally all they could handle down to a single shot, with Embiid leading the way. 

They screwed up the rebuild accelerating too fast once they had gotten their stars (the whole point of the process was to not stop tanking until you had talent - a well executed version would be done within 2-3 years), their stars were still good enough to drag them to some success when they made the Jimmy acquisition to help them out, and then they screwed up even more letting him walk to instead overpay role players. What’s the difference between the team that almost stopped the Raps’ championship path dead in its tracks and this one? It ain’t Embiid suddenly becoming a loser because of the teams he wasn’t even playing for losing games years before.


The Sixers lost two "leaders" in Butler and Redick. Butler was their closer last year and defensive stopper on the perimeter, and the Sixers never adequately filled the gaping hole he left. Richardson is a nice player, but he's a complementary guy and not a leader nor a lead horse. Redick, despite his age and declining skills, provided the Sixers with outside shooting and veteran savvy. Horford was a bad fit from day 1, but most people refused to see it. 

Just the overall pieces don't fit well. Harris, Simmons, and Embiid are poor fits next to one another, as they all need the ball to be successful. Simmons' inability or refusal to shoot from outside and Harris' limited playmaking abilities make them bad options to run a P&R with Embiid. And the selections of Simmons and Embiid were made by Hinkie, whose weaknesses go beyond the tank approach. His other limitations were: he had no long-term vision for the club other than to hope the lottery balls would fall in Philly's favour and they would land a generational talent. He had no plan in terms of how to build a club around his core players; he instituted a poor player development program; and he created a bad (i.e., losing) culture in Philly. For nearly five years, his philosophy was to hope to draft a Lebron James-like player and then ride his coattails back to respectability if not a championship. Hinkie wasn't fired because ownership lost patience but also because he was incompetent. 
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elT
DanH wrote:
Come on, there’s not some fundamental inability to win from the good players there. That “losing mentality” team gave the championship Raps literally all they could handle down to a single shot, with Embiid leading the way. 

They screwed up the rebuild accelerating too fast once they had gotten their stars (the whole point of the process was to not stop tanking until you had talent - a well executed version would be done within 2-3 years), their stars were still good enough to drag them to some success when they made the Jimmy acquisition to help them out, and then they screwed up even more letting him walk to instead overpay role players. What’s the difference between the team that almost stopped the Raps’ championship path dead in its tracks and this one? It ain’t Embiid suddenly becoming a loser because of the teams he wasn’t even playing for losing games years before.


Embiid lead the way in bullshit when things were going well for them and disappeared under Gasol rest of the way. Jimmy was heart and soul of that team, even though I'm no Butler fan it is clear now. And Raptors had incredibly poor shooting that series, some of it was their length and defense but it was still insanely bad shooting series for Raptors. Sixers got fooled by it being close and thought they are good. It will end up being the greatest achievement of that team, having the best view of the Shot.
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DanH
elT wrote:


Embiid lead the way in bullshit when things were going well for them and disappeared under Gasol rest of the way. Jimmy was heart and soul of that team, even though I'm no Butler fan it is clear now. And Raptors had incredibly poor shooting that series, some of it was their length and defense but it was still insanely bad shooting series for Raptors. Sixers got fooled by it being close and thought they are good. It will end up being the greatest achievement of that team, having the best view of the Shot.


Embiid won his minutes by 90 points in that series. Including by 39 points when being guarded by Gasol. 

Sixers got fooled by it being close and thought they were good? Then why did they allow drastic changes to happen, letting Butler and Redick walk? They were just dumb. This disaster of a team is the result. 

A LOT of it was their length and tough defence. Yes, the Raptors shot poorly too. But the Raptors are also good enough that even when shooting poorly, they can handle non-contending teams pretty easily.
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DanH


The Sixers lost two "leaders" in Butler and Redick. Butler was their closer last year and defensive stopper on the perimeter, and the Sixers never adequately filled the gaping hole he left. Richardson is a nice player, but he's a complementary guy and not a leader nor a lead horse. Redick, despite his age and declining skills, provided the Sixers with outside shooting and veteran savvy. Horford was a bad fit from day 1, but most people refused to see it. 

Just the overall pieces don't fit well. Harris, Simmons, and Embiid are poor fits next to one another, as they all need the ball to be successful. Simmons' inability or refusal to shoot from outside and Harris' limited playmaking abilities make them bad options to run a P&R with Embiid. And the selections of Simmons and Embiid were made by Hinkie, whose weaknesses go beyond the tank approach. His other limitations were: he had no long-term vision for the club other than to hope the lottery balls would fall in Philly's favour and they would land a generational talent. He had no plan in terms of how to build a club around his core players; he instituted a poor player development program; and he created a bad (i.e., losing) culture in Philly. For nearly five years, his philosophy was to hope to draft a Lebron James-like player and then ride his coattails back to respectability if not a championship. Hinkie wasn't fired because ownership lost patience but also because he was incompetent. 


I agree that Harris is an awful fit next to their two stars. His acquisition is one of the dumb things I am criticizing the team for post-Process. For Simmons' shooting, teams bet on prospects being able to add things all the time. The 76ers' development has failed Simmons, but drafting non-shooters and turning them into shooters is basically plan A for the Raptors, so, it's not a crazy idea. 

We don't really know what sort of development system Hinkie had in place or how effective it would have been. The first season Embiid was healthy enough to play, Hinkie was already fired. Simmons didn't play until a full season after Hinkie was fired. Kind of hard to blame him for their development given that. Neither player ever played a single minute on those "losing environment" teams. 

I also agree that them losing Redick and Butler and replacing them with Horford was a disaster for them and the main cause of their current issues. Trying to tie that to the tank they executed is a little odd, is my point.
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elT
DanH wrote:


I agree that Harris is an awful fit next to their two stars. His acquisition is one of the dumb things I am criticizing the team for post-Process. For Simmons' shooting, teams bet on prospects being able to add things all the time. The 76ers' development has failed Simmons, but drafting non-shooters and turning them into shooters is basically plan A for the Raptors, so, it's not a crazy idea. 

We don't really know what sort of development system Hinkie had in place or how effective it would have been. The first season Embiid was healthy enough to play, Hinkie was already fired. Simmons didn't play until a full season after Hinkie was fired. Kind of hard to blame him for their development given that. Neither player ever played a single minute on those "losing environment" teams. 

I also agree that them losing Redick and Butler and replacing them with Horford was a disaster for them and the main cause of their current issues. Trying to tie that to the tank they executed is a little odd, is my point.


What about MCW? Noel? Okafor?

Culture doesn't require court time to impact you. It is about mindset, behavior, accountability, approach, attitude etc.

The point is, Hinkie was bad while he was there and decisions he made are still impacting the Sixers despite him obviously not being to blame for stuff GMs after him did.
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DanH
elT wrote:


What about MCW? Noel? Okafor?

Culture doesn't require court time to impact you. It is about mindset, behavior, accountability, approach, attitude etc.

The point is, Hinkie was bad while he was there and decisions he made are still impacting the Sixers despite him obviously not being to blame for stuff GMs after him did.


Hinkie definitely made some bad picks. He deserves criticism for that, for sure. But the point of a long tank is that you eventually hit. In the hands of a better manager I've been steadfast in saying a process type tank would be a 2-3 year process (I was explicit in stating that Masai could do a quick tank in 1 or 2 bad seasons if need be) before the upwards swing starts. Hinkie wasn't great at the execution. 

However, those bad picks did not lead to the mess we saw in these playoffs. Embiid was not poisoned by some terrible culture to the point where he was able to contribute massively to almost taking down the eventual champs one year and then suddenly that poison kicked in the following year when the supporting cast was significantly worse just by magic. 

You can harp on the process all you like - heck you can crow over Philly's failures now as a karmic response to their tank, have fun with that. But let's not pretend that the biggest issues for the team are Embiid or Simmons, the only meaningful parts of Hinkie's process that are still with the team. The biggest issue is everything else around them. Most of which didn't have any experience with those losing teams and have been brought in to a team that's in the playoffs every year. 
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elT
DanH wrote:


Hinkie definitely made some bad picks. He deserves criticism for that, for sure. But the point of a long tank is that you eventually hit. In the hands of a better manager I've been steadfast in saying a process type tank would be a 2-3 year process (I was explicit in stating that Masai could do a quick tank in 1 or 2 bad seasons if need be) before the upwards swing starts. Hinkie wasn't great at the execution. 

However, those bad picks did not lead to the mess we saw in these playoffs. Embiid was not poisoned by some terrible culture to the point where he was able to contribute massively to almost taking down the eventual champs one year and then suddenly that poison kicked in the following year when the supporting cast was significantly worse just by magic. 

You can harp on the process all you like - heck you can crow over Philly's failures now as a karmic response to their tank, have fun with that. But let's not pretend that the biggest issues for the team are Embiid or Simmons, the only meaningful parts of Hinkie's process that are still with the team. The biggest issue is everything else around them. Most of which didn't have any experience with those losing teams and have been brought in to a team that's in the playoffs every year. 


Best multiyear tank job was done by OKC when Sam Presti nailed every freaking pick and got his team to the finals in 2012. That was fiver years since drafting Durant in 2007. The thing is, it was just year 3 that they won 50 games. 76ers in year three of The Process won 10 games. 10.

We just have to agree to disagree here. If I was a betting man I'd bet you a shitload of cash that Embiid wouldn't be constantly out of shape and doing bullshit acts if he was in a healthy, winning culture like Miami, Toronto, Portland, Boston, Indiana etc. I mean, he'd be suspended if we he was overweight in Miami. Need not go further. Similarly with Simmons, he would have made some progress and wouldn't be the exact same player when he was drafted. That is one of the key aspects of winning cultures, players simply have to get better and they do.

Could have Colangelo or Brand done better in that regard? Sure as hell. I'm not defending either of them one bit. I'm just not letting Hinkie of the hook because "the big bad conspiring league forced him out". No, he fucked up a ton and should have been fired after not making any progress in year three winning just 10 games. Any responsible owner would have done that. So yes, it is also on the owner who created the mess together with everyone involved and Hinkie.

I don't really care about the Sixers anymore. I'm happy the technocratic bullshit is dead, that the league reacted and went ahead and adjusted the lottery rules. Sure, some idiot in the future might try to do the same and will fail miserably but this disgrace is over. Its entire purpose was to help be part of the stage for the Shot. That is their greatest achievement.
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Mo_fusion
Olayyy olay olay olllayyy Philly suck, Philly sucks!
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moremilk
pretty great article from Hollinger on the process. Obviously, I agree with his conclusion

To say The Process was a mistake because of the current status of the Sixers is to entirely miss the point. In fact, the opposite is true: That the Sixers could remain a playoff team despite the profusion of own-goals shows the value of the original plan. The truth is that the trade-acquired assets and high lottery picks from four years of suckitude loaded the dice so heavily in Philadelphia’s favor that nobody could possibly screw it up, no matter how many times they shot themselves in the foot.

Going through the list of fuck-ups must be extremely depressing if you're a sixers fan ...

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It’s an amazing list. In less than four years they:

  • Traded two high second-round picks for half a year of Ish Smith.
  • Traded one high second-round pick for half a year of Trevor Booker, who was out of the rotation within weeks.
  • Traded a lottery pick from Sacramento in the regrettable Markelle Fultz–Jayson Tatum deal.
  • Traded the 42nd pick in 2019 for cash. This “cash” guy was a popular trade target.
  • Traded the 39th pick in 2018 for cash and a future second … the one above that was also exchanged for cash.
  • Traded the 39th and 46th picks in the 2017 draft for cash. Notable picks after No. 39 in that draft included Thomas Bryant (42), Dillon Brooks (45), Sterling Brown (46), and Monte Morris (51).
  • Traded Richaun Holmes to Phoenix for cash in the summer of 2018. Holmes made the minimum and has become a very effective player, while the Sixers toggled through five backup centers in losing to Toronto in the 2019 playoffs.
  • Turned Jerami Grant and a second-round pick into Anzejs Pasecniks via two separate trades in 2016 and 2017.
  • And finally, sent 2018 first-rounder Landry Shamet, two first-round picks, and likely high second-rounders from Detroit in 2021 and 2023 to the Clippers for Tobias Harris … a player who was six months from free agency and the Clippers wouldn’t have been able to keep.


full article below

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Hollinger: The Process is dead. Long live The Process.

John Hollinger 2h ago[comment-icon@2x] 54 [save-icon@2x]

Seven years ago, at the 2013 draft, newly installed Philadelphia Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie made a bold decision: He was going to trade his best player to the New Orleans Pelicans for two lottery picks. And after that, he was going to trade all of his other good players, too.

Thus began “The Process,” a four-year wander through the desert that produced win totals of 19, 18, 10 and 28. NBA teams had tanked for high draft picks before (and still do), but never this brazenly or for this long.

Few management decisions in any sport provoked a wider spectrum of reactions. Many Philly fans see Hinkie as a martyred hero, regarding him the way some might a political prisoner. For others, the Process was an insult, an act of graffiti on the game. And for the pragmatists, it was what it was: A GM playing his hand the best way he could with the cards he had in front of him.

In 2015-16, the third season of The Process, the Sixers were truly one of the worst teams in NBA history, going 10-72 while being outscored by more than 10 points a game. (Amazing side note: Nine players from that team remain in the league, and a few have become genuinely good.) At that point, the Sixers ownership — with a sharp nudge from the league — decided it had seen enough.

All told, Hinkie was only in charge for fewer than three seasons. Nonetheless, the asset haul from his tenure was impressive. In a five-year span, the Sixers picked sixth, 11th, third, 10th, third, first, and first.  They also amassed an almost comically large trove of second-round picks, a few of which remain in circulation, and the 24th and 26th overall picks in 2016.

We’re coming to the end of the line, however. This draft will be the last year of the pick bounty accumulated during Hinkie’s reign. The Sixers have four second-round picks in 2020, but afterward, their draft capital is just like everybody else’s: All they have left in the plus column are two future seconds, and they’re out one future second of their own.

The Process, then, is essentially over.

The Sixers will continue reaping some benefits, of course. Last time I checked they still had Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons on their roster, and those two are 26 and 24, respectively. But whatever happens from here is a different chapter, with a different coach (almost certainly) and very likely some other different key pieces as well.

What went wrong?

What stands out, at this juncture, is the disappointing results the Sixers have to show from the asset bounty of The Process. To date, it’s yielded two first-round playoff wins, one four-bounces-away-from-the-conference-finals team … and whatever that was this past season.

Going forward, further success could prove elusive. The roster is mismatched, capped out and far better suited to winning a game in 1991 than 2021. One hopes that this core wins more than two series when it’s all said and done, but it’s not assured.

The first turning point came in early 2016, when Hinkie stepped down via a now-infamous 13-page resignation note (my biggest failure as an analytics guy in a front office was not composing an even longer note when I left the Grizzlies, with the middle six pages in French). By that point, the league office and Sixers ownership had already conspired to insert Jerry Colangelo above him in the org chart.

Colangelo is one of the most decorated front-office figures in league annals. But in Philadelphia, he traded two high second-round picks for half a season of Ish Smith, conducted a front office “search” that concluded his own son was the best GM candidate, and then called it a day. The whole episode was an egregious failure of ownership.

Philly’s front office has been in flux ever since, with the younger Colangelo’s tenure ending via Burnergate and setting the stage for the current regime of Elton Brand. Both were subjected to periodic drive-bys from a since-departed minority owner who liked to stick his fingers in the pie.

As a result, Philly squandered much of The Process’s bounty. While not really adding much to the inherited Embiid-Simmons core, the Sixers also managed to set fire to several years’ worth of a normal team’s draft equity.

It’s an amazing list. In less than four years they:

  • Traded two high second-round picks for half a year of Ish Smith.
  • Traded one high second-round pick for half a year of Trevor Booker, who was out of the rotation within weeks.
  • Traded a lottery pick from Sacramento in the regrettable Markelle Fultz–Jayson Tatum deal.
  • Traded the 42nd pick in 2019 for cash. This “cash” guy was a popular trade target.
  • Traded the 39th pick in 2018 for cash and a future second … the one above that was also exchanged for cash.
  • Traded the 39th and 46th picks in the 2017 draft for cash. Notable picks after No. 39 in that draft included Thomas Bryant (42), Dillon Brooks (45), Sterling Brown (46), and Monte Morris (51).
  • Traded Richaun Holmes to Phoenix for cash in the summer of 2018. Holmes made the minimum and has become a very effective player, while the Sixers toggled through five backup centers in losing to Toronto in the 2019 playoffs.
  • Turned Jerami Grant and a second-round pick into Anzejs Pasecniks via two separate trades in 2016 and 2017.
  • And finally, sent 2018 first-rounder Landry Shamet, two first-round picks, and likely high second-rounders from Detroit in 2021 and 2023 to the Clippers for Tobias Harris … a player who was six months from free agency and the Clippers wouldn’t have been able to keep.

Even with all that lost draft equity, the Sixers would have been in great shape had they not also embarked on some spectacular failures in free agency. Once the Sixers started spending their cap money in the summer of 2016, they almost immediately began spending it badly on veteran filler like Sergio Rodriguez, Jerryd Bayless and Wilson Chandler.

And finally, there was last summer’s disaster. Based on what’s been reported, it appears the Sixers passed on giving a five-year max deal to Jimmy Butler but found the same money for a lesser player in Harris. Worse yet, instead of addressing the glaring need for a ballhandling creator on the perimeter that Butler’s loss exposed, Philly used its cap space from Butler’s departure to address the all-important backup center position and drop nearly $100 million on Al Horford. (Side note: Old friend Richaun Holmes was again a free agent and signed a bargain deal in Sacramento that provided massive value).

The deals for Harris and Horford rate among the worst in the game right now, but we’re not done yet. Philly also messed up by using its midlevel exception on little-used forward Mike Scott – once again neglecting the guard positions that loomed as such a weakness.

The Sixers did make one wise signing, however: Inking Trey Burke for the minimum. It might have been the best vet minimum deal of the 2019 summer. Alas, he hardly played and was cut in February, and now plays a key role for Dallas as exactly the type of shot-creating guard the Sixers lack. At least they hung on to Kyle O’Quinn, though, right?

Was it worth it?

To say The Process was a mistake because of the current status of the Sixers is to entirely miss the point. In fact, the opposite is true: That the Sixers could remain a playoff team despite the profusion of own-goals shows the value of the original plan. The truth is that the trade-acquired assets and high lottery picks from four years of suckitude loaded the dice so heavily in Philadelphia’s favor that nobody could possibly screw it up, no matter how many times they shot themselves in the foot.

Look at all those mistakes I enumerated above. Some involved tertiary assets, but several of them were serious, franchise-level gaffes. The Sixers made all of those mistakes within a four-year period, used a top-three pick on a guy with zero value, and still have a good team.

The entire reason it didn’t end in a catastrophic, cellar-dweller-for-a-decade-type disaster – like it would have for many other teams – is because the Sixers had such a ridiculous surfeit of draft-pick value that they could waste a huge chunk of it and still survive.

They could wildly overpay for half-seasons of role players and still have enough left in their asset quiver to land Butler and Harris. They could burn valuable picks in nearly every trade and send away Mikal Bridges on draft night, and still have enough picks left over to land Matisse Thybulle and Shake Milton. They could sign two of the bottom 10 contracts in the league and, even this spring, still inspire fear as a potential playoff opponent.

The NBA agrees with me.

Okay, the league hasn’t come out and said this, but it tacitly acknowledged that Philadelphia pursued a desirable strategy by limiting the incentives for teams to repeat it. Most notably, the league restructured the lottery odds in response to the Sixers’ intentional demise, helped along by the imitators who jockeyed for position ahead of the loaded 2018 draft. (Not that we would have done such a thing in Memphis, of course. I don’t know how we went 4-29 in our last 33 games that year but it greatly upset me. I’ll have to go back and see how that happened.)

As a result, we’re not going to see a strategy quite like this again. Philly’s own picks that ended up third, third, first and third in a four-year span would be unlikely to do nearly as well in the present lottery rules. Just ask Cleveland, which had the second-worst record each of the past two seasons but will pick fifth both times. Those lottery changes tilt the odds massively away from a long-term tanking project. Being horrible every year and still having a 50% chance of landing outside the top 4 just isn’t worth it.

Of course, you’ll still see “rebuilding” projects, like the one in Memphis the past two years where the Grizzlies rightly turned Marc Gasol and Mike Conley into draft capital, young players and trade exceptions. Every organization hits a point where trading old for young makes sense.

What you will never see again, however, is something quite as unabashed as what Hinkie attempted … at least unless the lottery rules change again to more heavily favor the teams with the worst records.

Until then, judgments will rain down on the one and only example of a sustained multi-year tank job in league annals. So let me lend my own: The irony is that the Sixers’ litany of mistakes over the past three years don’t prove that The Process was a mistake. They reveal what an overwhelming advantage it gave to a team whose roster offered no real prospect of enduring success.

It’s great that the league took away the incentives for teams to do this … but it also was the best way for Philadelphia to play its hand. The Process is dead, slowly strangled for years by terminal managerial incompetence before it was finally extinguished on Sunday. Its lessons, however, live on.

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elT
moremilk wrote:
pretty great article from Hollinger on the process. Obviously, I agree with his conclusion

To say The Process was a mistake because of the current status of the Sixers is to entirely miss the point. In fact, the opposite is true: That the Sixers could remain a playoff team despite the profusion of own-goals shows the value of the original plan. The truth is that the trade-acquired assets and high lottery picks from four years of suckitude loaded the dice so heavily in Philadelphia’s favor that nobody could possibly screw it up, no matter how many times they shot themselves in the foot.

Going through the list of fuck-ups must be extremely depressing if you're a sixers fan ...

moremilk wrote:


full article below



Bullshit worthy of Hollinger. The Process was about winning a bunch of championships. Nice try whorelinger, nice try with moving the goals posts back now.
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DanH
elT wrote:


Bullshit worthy of Hollinger. The Process was about winning a bunch of championships. Nice try whorelinger, nice try with moving the goals posts back now.


The obvious point there is that the management they’ve had over the past few years has been criminally incompetent. And yet they still made the playoffs. Which speaks to the effectiveness of the tank. That’s the point. How many win-now teams would make that many mistakes and still end up a playoff team?

No one is questioning that the 76ers fell way short of the goal of the tank. But the tank isn’t the part that left them short. It’s the clusterfuck of idiocy that followed it.
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elT
DanH wrote:


The obvious point there is that the management they’ve had over the past few years has been criminally incompetent. And yet they still made the playoffs. Which speaks to the effectiveness of the tank. That’s the point. How many win-now teams would make that many mistakes and still end up a playoff team?

No one is questioning that the 76ers fell way short of the goal of the tank. But the tank isn’t the part that left them short. It’s the clusterfuck of idiocy that followed it.


I'm not defending the clusterfuck of idiocy that followed. Just to make that clear again.

The process was a clusterfuck of idiocy before the one after it. The fact that they have Embiid and Simmons now is result of NBA's brilliant design of talent distribution via draft, design that Hinkie tried to corrupt. Hopefully it never results in NBA killing the draft and establishing European style academies that some in online "basketball intelligentsia" advocate and even some owners and managers like Cuban and Morey.

Hinkie's logic of "pulling levers" as path to success, his own words, is straight out of Wall Street MO - something he said he learned while working at some capital company. If we put aside the bastion of corruption that is Wall Street and take that MO as something that can work fairly in vacuum of financial transactions we still can't transplant that MO to NBA without acknowledging the high likelihood that approach will generate problems that will be above the owner's mandate to handle. The league is in a way an organism, you can't take one franchise and have it function in a bubble. To expect that was idiotic from Hinkie and when his decisions and management started impacting the league both in terms of terrible narrative in media and really bad attendance numbers on Sixers road games at the time, the hammer had to come down. So yes, pulling levers worked in a way that they got Simmons and Embiid and shitload of other assets. Where the process failed is turning that into something BEFORE the hammer came down. He not only behaved like the hammer is not ever going to come down but as it didn't exist. And that is idiotic.

And when the hammer came down, Hinkie couldn't handle it and left. He should have stayed along and prove that he can finish the process.

I'd also argue, without a grain of defending Colangelo, that the trade for Fultz, at the time and in the vacuum was not as horrible as it turned out to be. Fultz was perceived as universal, consensus #1, his game seemed to perfectly fit what Sixers needed at PG. The injury, how Colangelo managed it and how it impacted the kid and the team was complete clusterfuck of idioicy and probably the worst thing to happen to that franchise. However, if Fultz didn't go through all that and became what vast majority of people expected him to become it would have been a good trade. Still, IMO, it wouldn't have offset the Colangelo effect or Brand effect or the terrible culture there - which in large part was set up by Hinkie.

If Hinkie was a little less obsessive with asset accumulation and little bit more oriented towards actually building a winner he would have been unobstructed in doing his job. The fact he perceived none of that as an issue, together with cheating New Orleans in Jrue Holiday trade for which there was an investigation and multi-million dollar fine, ruining relationships with players and agents, ignoring the problem his approach is causing for the league(all of which is well documented and reported), completely ignoring the need to build good organizational culture, player development and overall human aspect that isn't captured in spread sheets - all of that is definitive proof that The Process failed. Yes, it succeed in one aspect, asset accumulation but failed in every other aspect of building a successful basketball team. What the league did was absolutely necessary and justified and well executed. The clusterfuck of idiocy that followed is on the ownership, Bryan Colangelo and Elton Brand.

The Process was a success in terms of asset accumulation, its stated goal. It definitively failed in every other way before Colangelo and Brand did their thing. It is therefor a failure because asset accumulation can not be the only and sole part of any team building process. It is not how this works. That is why I'm not letting Hinkie off the hook and being a stubborn fuck about all of this. Bernie Madoff also accumulated a shitload of assets but ignored other key aspects of his job. He also failed. Yes, I know, a massive financial fraud and few years of a sports team fucking up is not at all comparable in impact on life but there is that particular kind of similarity of ignoring and/or working against parts of the reality.
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