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DanH
Casey's always an interesting interview.
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elT
DanH wrote:
Casey's always an interesting interview.


I loved how he was interviewed, just the right balance of seriousness, appreciation, fun and teasing/provoking. Love it when ESPN guys do a good job, take it serious and prepare.
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LX
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LX
Not sure about the hotseat narrative but some good tidbits in here nonetheless.

https://www.yahoo.com/amphtml/sports/star-coach-dwane-casey-seemingly-always-hot-seat-171859335.html?__twitter_impression=true

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Think about it: When is Casey not on the hot seat? “My butt is burning from being on the hot seat every year,” Casey said, laughing. His offenses — ranked in the top 10 the last four seasons — have been deemed too simplistic and it often felt like the Raptors were one early playoff exit from GM Masai Ujiri — who inherited Casey when he took the job in 2013 — letting Casey go.

“Honestly though, I don’t feel that way,” Casey said. “I’m coaching to win, and I don’t worry about all that outside crap. I know what we’re doing here, I’m proud of what we’re doing here. Ownership, they are supportive. A lot of [the hot-seat talk] is hopefully media driven because I think people appreciate what we’re working with, developing players and getting better every year.

“If Masai walked in tomorrow and [fired me], I understand that is the job. I’m not looking over me, behind me, whatever. Because I know I can fish. I know how to fish. I know I can coach. I know the game. I’ve been in the game a long time. Masai and I are a lot alike in the fact that we have in common that we want to win. We want to develop and work hard. Those common denominators have kept us together.”

Together, and thriving. Cleveland has sent Toronto home the last two postseasons, but this season the Raptors believe they have a team built to better compete. Casey overhauled his offense last summer, dumping an isolation-heavy, 3-point averse style for a more free-flowing offense that has the Raptors ranked in the top 10 in 3-pointers attempted (32.4 per game) and made (11.6) this season. After the team moved off several pricey veterans last summer, the young players Casey has spent years developing have capably stepped in.

“Dwane is incredible,” Celtics coach Brad Stevens said. “Not only have they tweaked some of the things they are doing on offense, but they have become more switch-oriented [on defense]. From an X’s and O’s standpoint, it’s obvious they are exceptionally well coached. But when you go even further and see how well the young players are playing, it’s a testament to the players but it’s also a testament to the environment.”

Casey knows the challenge in front of him. Regular-season success is meaningless if it doesn’t come with a postseason payoff. “The next step we take is the hardest step we take — going good to great with the same group,” Casey said. And he understands that when a team is together for awhile, a coach’s voice can become stale. Nowadays, Casey delegates more, empowering assistant coach Nick Nurse to run the offensive drills in practice, and Rex Kalamian to run the defense. He’s formed a leadership council — headed by Lowry, DeRozan and Ibaka — that he discusses everything from travel plans to practice times with.

“Early in my coaching career, I was doing everything,” Casey said. “You can’t do that and keep it fresh. If you say the same thing over and over again, it’s going to get stale.”

Casey is excited about coaching the All-Star Game. He remembers marveling at Kobe Bryant, then still a teenager, waving Karl Malone out of the post in 1998. “The moxie, the nerve to wave out a great player,” Casey said. “That showed me that Kobe was going to be great.” Casey says he has two goals: that nobody gets hurt and that his team plays to win. “The All-Star Games have deteriorated,” Casey said. “Michael Jordan wanted to win at tiddlywinks. That’s the competitive spirit I want our team to have. We owe it to the junior high coaches, the high school coaches, the AAU coaches to be an example. To always play the right way.”

Next week Casey will be back in Toronto, trying to drive the Raptors to new heights. There may come a day when Casey isn’t feeling quite so much pressure. That day isn’t here yet.

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Raptorman
Someone find a stat for me.  DC is an inherited coach for Masai.  Whats the record length of tenure for an inherited coach?  Most are gone after one season or less. 
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Dario
https://www.acast.com/theverticalpodcastwithwoj/toronto-coach-dwane-casey

woj podcast with Case

[DWQCNF0W0AAlWB4]
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elT
CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

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LX
elT wrote:
CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

CASEY KICKS ASS!!!

CASEY KICKS ASS!!!



Multiple Levels
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JeffB
That interview was amazing. From Woj and his line of questioning to Casey and his great stories, boasting of Toronto and Raptors organization and other stories. Very enjoyable listen
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LX
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LX

From Koreen
Coach of the year is a subjective award, but Dwane Casey has done an objectively wonderful job for Raptors

[USATSI_10691513-1024x768]

https://theathletic.com/270668/2018/03/12/coach-of-the-year-is-a-subjective-award-but-dwane-casey-has-done-an-objectively-wonderful-job-for-raptors/

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Even if turning your team into a pleasant surprise is not always the determining factor, it is more often than not a prerequisite. Mike D’Antoni won it last year as the Rockets enjoyed a 14-win leap from the year before. Steve Kerr got it in 2016 as the Warriors put together the greatest regular season record of all time. Mike Budenholzer’s Hawks won 60 games in 2014-15 after winning 38 games the year before. You could go on and on and on, and the reason is simple: Since we get to see so little of what a coach does in terms of preparation, team-building and strategizing, and would have trouble ascribing value to it even if we did, essentially all we have to go on is a team’s record, and how it defied our preconceived notions.

If we are to use the difference between actual results and pre-season expectations as our guide, there is no doubt who should win the coach of the year this season. He gained his NBA coaching chops on George Karl’s staff. He spent plenty of years trying to manage the ever-chatty Gary Payton. He is a popular figure in the city of Seattle.

Yes, Nate McMillan should win coach of the year.

Of course, the same things that could be said about the Pacers coach could also be said about the Raptors coach, Dwane Casey, another front-runner. Looking at the sheer breadth of legitimate coach of the year candidates, you can see why that formula is so reductive. In the wake of the Paul George trade, the Pacers were supposed to be a lottery team, maybe even competing for one of the top picks in this year’s draft. The fact that they were supposed to be so bad gives them more room to improve, possibly out-performing their expectations by about 50 per cent. Teams that were supposed to be average, good or even very good in the first place simply have less room to surprise.

[34-AM]

* From betonline.ag
** From fivethirtyeight.com



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It is a subjective award, and who you prefer is a matter of taste. The Celtics lost Hayward in the first quarter of the season, and Brad Stevens has built a great Eastern Conference team regardless. The 76ers were supposed to be at least another year away from contention, and that was assuming Markelle Fultz could play semi-functional professional basketball; instead, under Brett Brown, they might rise as high as third in the Eastern Conference.

In the Western Conference, D’Antoni has a case to take the award for a second-straight year, acclimating Chris Paul (and also dealing with his prolonged absence) as the Rockets likely grab the league’s best record. Casey’s former fellow assistant in Dallas, Terry Stotts, is overseeing Portland trying to separate itself from the chaotic playoff pack. The Pelicans lost all-star DeMarcus Cousins midway through the year, and Alvin Gentry has kept them afloat as Anthony Davis reminds people that he was the first, and maybe best, of the unicorns. Utah lost Hayward in free agency and played without Rudy Gobert for an extended stretch, and the Jazz might somehow find their way into the playoffs, a credit to Quin Snyder.

Whether you want to give credit to the players, coaches or management for those teams’ heightened success is a personal decision. As Casey said when he coached LeBron James’ team at the all-star game, it was as much of an organizational honour as anything. That would hold true for the coach of the year award, should Casey win it. He has company, but it is impossible to say he does not deserve it.

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elT
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Casey is the third coach in NBA history to improve his team's win total in six of seven seasons. The others were Boston's Red Auerbach (1955-56 to 1961-62) and Phoenix's John MacLeod (1974-75 to 1980-81).



http://www.espn.com/nba/recap?gameId=400975933
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LX
https://www.thestar.com/sports/raptors/opinion/2018/10/12/coach-casey-is-so-over-the-raptors.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

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AUBURN HILLS, MICH.—As places of banishment go, Dwane Casey’s office at the Detroit Pistons’ suburban practice facility isn’t exactly a bleak island of despair. The place is huge, spacious enough to house a boardroom table alongside the head coach’s desk. And everywhere you look is a conversation starter. There’s a framed photo of Casey with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and another of Casey with Drake. And there’s one, too, of Casey with Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan. 

“We had dinner in San Antonio earlier this month,” Casey was saying, speaking of DeRozan. “Had a great time with DeMar and his fiancée and their two beautiful daughters. Caught up on old times. Lot of laughs. Little bit of crying.”

Former assistant Nick Nurse took over from Dwane Casey — now running the show in Detroit — as head coach of the Raptors. The chill between the former colleagues is as palpable as it appears mutual.

And while Casey said the move to Michigan hasn’t been easy on his wife and two school-aged children, all of whom had grown to love the GTA, the circumstance has allowed the family to lay down roots. The Caseys recently bought a house in the Detroit suburbs. In Toronto, despite seven seasons of success that turned Casey into the greatest coach in franchise history, the family stuck to leasing in Summerhill.

“(In Toronto) I was always on a two-year deal, or another year to go, so we never bought,” Casey said. “I was always on that short leash.”

Now in charge of a Pistons team that’s missed the playoffs eight of the past nine seasons but figures to be on the upswing without the burden of outsize expectations, Casey said the change of scenery has come with other upsides. 

“(Predecessor) Stan Van Gundy laid an excellent foundation here as a coach. So it’s not like you’re at the bottom. We’re not at the top. But we’re in the mix,” Casey said. “And that’s a good place to be because you can come in and put your stamp on it.”

Along with inheriting a roster that includes Blake Griffin, Andre Drummond and Reggie Jackson, Casey has been reunited with ex-Raptor point guard Jose Calderon, a 37-year-old alumnus of Casey’s sub-.500 early days in Toronto. (“We talk about the old times and laugh,” Casey said of Calderon.) The coach said he’s also in near-daily contact with Pistons owner Tom Gores, a Beverly Hills billionaire who’s deeply involved in the operation.

“That kind of respect and relationship (with an owner) is good to have. Hopefully you develop an understanding that it takes time to build, that you’re not going to just flip a switch,” Casey said. “But I’m just energized, just excited. Got a chip on my shoulder to let people know you still can coach, that you weren’t the problem, you weren’t the reason we didn’t make the NBA finals (in Toronto).” 

Not that there aren’t regrets. The Raptors, Casey will tell you, should have done better than fall to LeBron James and the Cavaliers in a second-round sweep last spring. Game 1 should have been theirs. Ditto Game 3, after which Ujiri unleashed a torrent of rage on the coaching staff that foreshadowed Casey’s eventual doom. But James represented the East in the NBA final eight straight years. And despite the long list of opposing coaches fired for the sin of losing to him, it’s safe to say the alleged inadequacy of the opponents’ game plan will not go down as the root of LeBron’s greatness.

“You tip your hat to those (James-led) teams,” Casey said. “The one thing I can do: I can hold my head high with what we put together. What the players put together, what the organization put together, what the ownership put together — it’s left in a good place. Whoever takes the credit for it, I don’t care. But it’s a culmination of a lot of years put together.”

Still, the cruel truth is that Casey, for all his toil, won’t be around to see the franchise through its promising season in its history, with James gone West and Kawhi Leonard come North and nothing but tantalizing possibility on the horizon.

“They did a good job this year bringing in Kawhi Leonard, who’s a top-three, top-four player in the league. That’s something you dream of,” Casey said.

Not that the coach would have easily endorsed the trade that sent DeRozan and other assets to San Antonio in return for Leonard and Danny Green.

“I love DeMar. I would have fought for DeMar,” Casey said. “But Kawhi is a top player.”

Has Casey, in the days since Ujiri took the big swing, allowed himself to ponder how he’d be handling the new-look Raptors, or how the old-look Raptors might fare in an LeBron-less East?

“It’s the last thing on my mind,” the coach said.

And now that a reporter has made it top of mind?

“You wonder what would have happened. What if?” Casey said. “But what’s the old saying? If ifs and buts were candies and nuts we’d all have a merry Christmas. That’s water under the bridge now.”

Which is not to say all parties have made peace. In the days after Casey was fired, he said he was inundated with messages of support from members of the NBA community. But one notable voice was silent. Nick Nurse, Casey’s five-year assistant who would eventually be hired as Casey’s successor, did not reach out. Nurse has acknowledged as much in interviews. The chill between the former colleagues is as palpable as it appears mutual.

“That’s his prerogative,” Casey said of Nurse. “The only thing that hurts — and I’m not hurt, I’m a big boy, but the only thing you think about: When we hired (Nurse) in Toronto, he had never had an NBA interview … We brought him aboard. But it is what it is. This is the NBA. Don’t cry for me. If they feel like he’s the guy for the job, so be it. If I was the problem after building the program for seven years, so be it. That’s Ujiri’s decision.”

Casey smiles and shakes his head. He wants it made clear he’s not wallowing in bitterness. He’s simply responding to a persistent line of questioning by recounting a few facts. Life is good, he says, and life goes on. And hey, the season’s finally upon us. He’ll be going back to Toronto with the Pistons for a game Nov. 14. 

“It’ll be emotional,” Casey said. “It’ll be good to see friends, see people you haven’t seen in a while. I’m sure it’ll be different to be on the other end (of the arena), although I’ve been there before as an assistant. But it’ll be good. It’s nothing but good. All good, all the time. I haven’t spent a minute (thinking), ‘Whoa, I wish I was back in Toronto’ or ‘They did me wrong.’ Because there’s so many great things going on here that I’m excited about. I’m in a good spot. I landed well here.”

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